Transcript: Ep. 6 - Redberry Lake | Nov 08, 2016

(Music plays)

The screen shows silos by dawn on a countryside landscape. Following, images of a city and people getting off a van. Next, girls and boys download bags and boxes from cars and vans.

A Male Narrator says IT'S THE BEGINNING
OF A NEW SCHOOL YEAR,
AND THESE ENVIRONMENT
AND SUSTAINABILITY STUDENTS
FROM THE UNIVERSITY
OF SASKATCHEWAN
HAVE TRAVELLED TO THE REDBERRY
LAKE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
TO PARTICIPATE IN
A SPECIAL FIELD COURSE.
IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE,
THEY DON'T KNOW
WHAT THEY'RE IN FOR.
THIS PROGRAM'S UNIQUE FOCUS
ATTRACTS A LOT
OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS,
AND FOR MANY OF THEM,
THIS WILL BE THEIR
FIRST TIME IN A CANOE.

Next, a canoe instructor addresses a group.

She explains
THE FRONT OF THE CANOE
IS CALLED THE BOW.
THE EASIEST WAY
TO FIND IT -
IT HAS ROOM
FOR YOUR FEET!

Next. a group of people sail in canoes, get together for readings and experiment taking samples of liquids and putting those in bottles.

The Narrator says AS STUDENTS HOPING
TO STUDY THE ENVIRONMENT,
THEY PROBABLY
EXPECT TO LEARN
ABOUT REDBERRY'S UNUSUALLY
SALTY WATER CHEMISTRY,
AND ABOUT THE REGION'S
RARE PRAIRIE GRASSES.
THEY MIGHT ALSO EXPECT
TO LEARN ABOUT THE WILDLIFE
THAT COMES TO REDBERRY,
LIKE NORTH AMERICA'S
LARGEST BIRD,
THE AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN.
BUT WHAT THEY MAY NOT EXPECT
IS WHAT THEY'RE GOING TO LEARN
FROM THE SMALL RURAL
COMMUNITY HERE,
WHERE THE CONSTANT STRUGGLE
TO BE ECONOMICALLY VIABLE
LIVES RIGHT ALONGSIDE
A STAUNCH DETERMINATION
TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT
THEY CALL HOME.

A series of fast clips shows new landscapes and new spots in the countryside.

The Narrator continues
BIOSPHERE RESERVES
ARE REGIONS OF GLOBAL
ECOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE,
THAT MAKE
AN ON-GOING COMMITMENT
TO THE UNITED NATIONS
TO STRIVE FOR SUSTAINABILITY.
THEY ARE NOT PARKS,
AND THEY HAVE NO
LEGAL AUTHORITY.
THEY ARE PLACES WHERE PEOPLE
ARE INSPIRED TO FIND WAYS
TO LIVE AND WORK
IN HARMONY WITH NATURE.

A series of fast clips shows top views from the sea and its beaches; images from the countryside, vegetation and animals in the zone. A man studying a sample and a group of young men and women walking in the forest.

(theme music plays)

The Narrator continues
THIS SERIES EXPLORES
WHAT'S HAPPENING
IN CANADA'S
BIOSPHERE RESERVES -
THE SUCCESSES
AND THE CHALLENGES
OF PEOPLE DETERMINED TO CREATE
A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
FOR THEIR COMMUNITIES.
COME WITH US
ON A COAST-TO-COAST ADVENTURE
SPANNING THOUSANDS OF YEARS,
AND IT JUST MIGHT CHANGE
THE WAY YOU THINK
ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT
AND OUR PLACE IN IT.

A fast-motion clip shows northern lights, flock of white birds, woods, mountains, a port, people trekking, sailing and working with various animals.

Against a field on a sunny day, the title of the show reads "Striking Balance. Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve. Narrated by Jim Cuddy."

The Narrator says THERE ARE A LOT OF REASONS WHY
SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT
AND SUSTAINABILITY,
ALSO KNOWN AS SENS,
TAKES STUDENTS EVERY YEAR
TO THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
ONE OF THOSE REASONS
IS THAT THIS LAKE
IS A GREAT LABORATORY
FOR TEACHING STUDENTS
ABOUT WATER QUALITY.

A clip show a group of men and women gathered in a circle and sitting down, out in the open. Next, some of them take samples of the water.

Tyneal appears on screen. She’s in her twenties. She has long blond hair in a ponytail and wears a grey hoodie and a black cap. The caption below reads "Tyneal Knackstedt. Student - School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan."

Tyneal says WE ARE LOOKING
AT WATER SAMPLES TO SEE
DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND
DISSOLVED TOTAL PARTICLES.

Anson appears next. He’s in his mid-twenties. He has short reddish hair and a matching beard. He wears a plaid short-sleeve shirt over a black T-shirt. The caption changes to "Anson Main. PhD Candidate - School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan."

Anson says NOW WE'RE GETTING
A BIT OF COLOUR.
IF WE DON'T HAVE WATER,
ESSENTIALLY WE DON'T SURVIVE.
THE REASON THAT WE
LOOK AT WATER QUALITY
IS BECAUSE WATER IS CONSTANTLY
SOMETHING THAT'S IN FLUX.
AND AS WATER CHANGES,
TYPICALLY SO DOES
THE ENVIRONMENT AROUND IT
THAT'S RELIANT ON THAT WATER.

The Narrator says LEARNING ABOUT WATER QUALITY
CAN HAPPEN ALMOST ANYWHERE,
BUT REDBERRY
IS A SALTWATER LAKE
SURROUNDED
BY A FRESHWATER WATERSHED,
GIVING STUDENTS
THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN
ABOUT BOTH AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS.

As they speak, the screen shows footage of the students getting in the water and collecting samples for studies.

Chelsea shows up next. She’s in her twenties and has short brown hair down to the shoulders in a ponytail and wears a blue sleeveless shirt and sunglasses. The caption changes to "Chelsea Oliphant-Rescsanski. Student - School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan."

Chelsea says THIS LAKE IS INTERESTING
BECAUSE IT IS A LAKE
WITH HIGH SALINITY,
WHICH IS NOT SOMETHING
THAT YOU WOULD EXPECT.
SO THAT MAKES IT UNIQUE,
IN TERMS OF THE PLANTS
AND THE ANIMALS
THAT CAN LIVE HERE.

Anson says WE DO HAVE A SALINIZATION
PROBLEM IN THE WORLD,
AND IT'S IMPORTANT
THEN TO BE ABLE TO UNDERSTAND
WHAT ARE THE FEATURES
OF SOMETHING,
IN TERMS OF SALINITY CHANGES,
THAT WE CAN IDENTIFY TO PRESERVE
OTHER ECOLOGICAL AREAS
FOR DRINKING WATER
OR FOR HABITAT.

The Narrator says SCIENTISTS
HAVE BEEN DRAWN TO REDBERRY
SINCE THE LATE 1800S.
ONE OF A HANDFUL
OF SALT LAKES ON THE PRAIRIES,
REDBERRY IS SALTY BECAUSE
OF MAGNESIUM SULPHATE,
OR EPSOM SALTS,
LEACHING OUT
OF THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE.

A short clip shows footage of underwater vegetation. Next, a satellite Redberry Lake map appears on screen. The caption on top reads "Redberry Lake Closed Watershed."

The Narrator continues
REDBERRY HAS TWO SMALL
FRESHWATER STREAMS
FLOWING INTO IT,
WITHOUT ANY STREAMS
FLOWING OUT OF IT,
CREATING WHAT'S KNOWN
AS A CLOSED WATERSHED.
THESE TWO THINGS
COMBINE TO MAKE REDBERRY
A GREAT PLACE TO STUDY
CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE PRAIRIES.

Next, the caption changes to "Doctor Marley Waiser. Former Research Scientist. Environment Canada." She’s in her fifties. She has short blond hair down to the shoulders and wears glasses, an orange blouse and a jeans jacket.

Marley says THE OVERARCHING EFFECT
OF WATER LOSS ON THIS LAKE
IS CLIMATE,
SO EVAPORATION.
IN THE 1920S, IT WAS ABOUT
TWENTY FIVE METERS DEEP.

A new satellite map shows a measuring tape dipping into the waters of Redberry Lake with the sign "25 meters" next to it.

Marley continues
AND WHEN WE WERE STUDYING
THE LAKE IN THE 2000s,
THE MAXIMUM DEPTH
WAS AROUND 15 OR 16 METERS
SO THAT'S AN INCREDIBLE
LOSS OF WATER
OVER THAT SHORT
PERIOD OF TIME.
AND IF YOU ADDED SALT
TO A BEAKER OF WATER
AND YOU SET IT OUTSIDE
AND YOU LET THE WATER EVAPORATE,
WELL THE SALTS WOULD INCREASE
AND EVENTUALLY
IF THE WATER WAS ALL GONE
THEN THERE'D JUST BE
SALT LEFT IN THE BEAKER.
WELL THE SAME THING
APPLIES TO REDBERRY LAKE.

The Narrator says BY SIMPLY MEASURING
REDBERRY'S SALINITY OVER TIME,
SCIENTISTS CAN GET A GOOD IDEA
OF HOW THE REGION'S
CLIMATE IS CHANGING.
THAT'S USEFUL INFORMATION
IN AND OF ITSELF,
BUT TO SCIENTISTS
LIKE MARLEY WAISER,
REDBERRY IS ALSO UNUSUAL
IN OTHER WAYS.

A clip shows Marley taking a sample of the water of the lake and putting it in a jar.

The Narrator continues
ITS PHOSPHOROUS
CONCENTRATIONS ARE HIGH -
HIGH ENOUGH THAT SCIENTISTS
EXPECT THIS LAKE
TO HAVE PROBLEMS WITH
POTENTIALLY TOXIC ALGAE BLOOMS,
BUT THE LAKE DOES NOT
SUFFER FROM THEM.
THE LAKE ALSO HAS VERY HIGH
DISSOLVED CARBON,
SO SCIENTISTS
EXPECT IT TO BE TEA COLOURED,
BUT INSTEAD
IT'S INCREDIBLY CLEAR.

The screen shows two jars, one next to the other, filled with water. The one on the left is darker and reads "Nearby Lake"; the one to the right is clear and reads "Redberry Lake."

Marley says STUDYING THIS LAKE TAUGHT ME
TO OPEN UP MY MIND
AS A SCIENTIST
AND TO REALLY EXPECT
THE UNEXPECTED.

The Narrator says REDBERRY'S UNEXPECTED CHEMISTRY
IS ONLY PART OF WHAT MAKES
THIS BIOSPHERE RESERVE
AN EXCELLENT
NATURAL LABORATORY
FOR THE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT
AND SUSTAINABILITY STUDENTS.

A new satellite view shows a map of Canada and the United States. It situates the Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve in the middle, between Alberta and Manitoba. Next. Aspen Parkland, Boreal Forest, Grasslands and Saskatchewan are highlighted.

The Narrator continues
THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE IS LOCATED
IN THE ASPEN
PARKLAND ECOREGION,
WHICH IS A TRANSITION ZONE
BETWEEN THE BOREAL FOREST
TO THE NORTH
ALTHOUGH 90 PERCENT OF THE PARKLAND
HAS BEEN CONVERTED
TO AGRICULTURAL CROPLAND,
THE RARE NATURAL HABITATS
THAT REMAIN
ARE A MEETING PLACE FOR SPECIES
FROM NORTHERN, WESTERN,
AND EASTERN CANADA.
BIRDS ESPECIALLY
SEEM TO LOVE REDBERRY.
THIS FACT WAS RECOGNIZED
WAY BACK IN 1918,
WHEN THE AREA
WAS DESIGNATED
AS A FEDERAL MIGRATORY
BIRD SANCTUARY.

A series of clips shows birds flying over the lake and fishing for food.
The Narrator continues
MORE THAN 180 BIRD SPECIES
FLOCK TO THE LAKE EVERY YEAR,
BUT REDBERRY IS BEST KNOWN
AS A PRIME NESTING SITE
FOR THE ONCE-THREATENED
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN.
NOBODY KNOWS PELICANS BETTER
HERE THAN ONE OF THE FOUNDERS
OF THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
PETER KINGSMILL.

The caption changes to "Peter Kingsmill. Founder - Redberry Pelican Project and Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve." He’s in his fifties. He has short dark hair and a goatee. He wears glasses and a grey hoodie.

Peter says WE ALWAYS THINK OF PELICANS
AS BEING SOUTHERN BIRDS.
AND AMERICAN WHITES...
THEY ALL NEST PRETTY MUCH
IN CANADA AND NORTHERN
GREAT PLAINS.
AND SO THEY ACTUALLY...
THEY'RE BORN AND RAISED HERE,
BUT THEY JUST GO
DOWN SOUTH FOR WINTER.
EVERYWHERE THEY GO,
THEY CHOOSE ISLANDS WHERE
PREDATORS CAN'T APPROACH.
THESE ISLANDS ARE SUFFICIENTLY
AWAY FROM SHORE
THAT SELDOM DOES
ANYTHING GET OUT THERE
LIKE COYOTES AND STUFF.
IT'S A QUIET LAKE WITHOUT
A LOT OF BOATING ACTIVITY ON IT,
SO OVER THE YEARS THEY HAVEN'T
BEEN ALL THAT BOTHERED
BY THE AMOUNT
OF HUMAN ACTIVITY.

As he speaks, the screen shows images of pelicans in the area.

Peter continues
I THINK WHEN PEOPLE
SEE THEM SOARING UP
OVER THEIR HOUSES
OR THEIR FARMS OR WHATEVER,
THEY ALWAYS STOP AND WATCH -
BECAUSE THEY ARE SO GRACEFUL,
ALTHOUGH THEY LOOK
SO SILLY CLUMSY.
PEOPLE LIKE THEM.

The Narrator says IT'S BECAUSE
OF PROTECTION HERE AT REDBERRY,
AND OTHER IMPORTANT
BREEDING COLONIES,
THAT THE AMERICAN
WHITE PELICAN HAS BECOME
A CONSERVATION SUCCESS STORY,
WITH MORE THAN 100,000
BIRDS BREEDING
IN CANADA EVERY YEAR.
BUT AS REMARKABLE AS REDBERRY'S
NATURAL FEATURES ARE,
PERHAPS THE MOST
IMPORTANT LESSON
CAN BE LEARNED FROM
THE PEOPLE HERE.
BECAUSE WHILE THE AMERICAN
WHITE PELICAN'S NUMBERS
HAVE INCREASED TO THE POINT
WHERE IT IS NO LONGER LISTED
AS A SPECIES AT RISK,
THE SAME UNFORTUNATELY
CANNOT BE SAID
FOR REDERRY'S
HUMAN POPULATION.
SINCE A PEAK OF
7,000 IN THE 1950s,
THE POPULATION OF
THE REDBERRY LAKE WATERSHED
HAS DECLINED
TO FEWER THAN 1,000.
ABANDONED HOMESTEADS
LITTER THE LANDSCAPE,
RELICS OF
THE SMALL FAMILY FARM
THAT PROVED TO BE
ECONOMICALLY UNSUSTAINABLE
IN THE FACE OF GLOBAL MARKETS.

A clip shows a series of images of people dancing as part of a ceremony, kids and babies, families together and men riding horses. Next, old footage shows a clip of a young man collecting a sample followed by a group of adults walking down the forest.

The Narrator continues
AND YET, EVEN DURING THIS SLOW
DECLINE IN POPULATION,
THE PREDOMINANTLY
UKRAINIAN COMMUNITY
HAS REMAINED VIBRANT,
AND THERE ARE SIGNS THAT
A BRIGHTER FUTURE MAY BE AHEAD.
FOR OVER A CENTURY,
SCIENTISTS HAVE BEEN MONITORING
THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION
OF REDBERRY LAKE.
BUT TODAY, PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER
THE WORLD ARE MONITORING
WHAT'S HAPPENING
TO THE COMMUNITY HERE,
SEARCHING FOR SOLUTIONS
TO USE IN PLACES EVERYWHERE
THAT ARE STRUGGLING TO MAKE
THEIR HOMES SUSTAINABLE,
WHILE AT THE SAME TIME,
PRESERVING THE VERY LANDSCAPE
THAT JUST MIGHT MAKE
THAT POSSIBLE.

(music plays)

The caption changes to "Larry Hawrysh. Fouder. Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve. Farmer." He’s in his fifties. He has dark blond hair and a full beard. He wears a mint green shirt underneath a taftan jacket.

Larry says AS I WAS GROWING UP,
I WAS TOLD BY MY PARENTS,
"GET AN EDUCATION.
GET OUTTA HERE.
"GO GET AN EASY JOB.
YOU DON'T WANNA BE
DOING THIS," Y'KNOW,
BECAUSE MY GRANDPARENTS,
MY PARENTS WORKED HARD.

A series of pictures on screen shows Larry’s family at work.

Larry continues
THE FARMS WEREN'T AS MECHANIZED
AS THEY ARE NOW.
THERE WAS A LOT
OF PHYSICAL LABOUR,
THE BODIES BROKE DOWN,
I MEAN, IT WAS GET OUT,
MAKE YOURSELF
A BETTER LIFE
AND, MOST FARMS WERE SMALL.
THEY WERE LIKE,
300 ACRES TO 500 ACRES,
AS THE COST OF FARMING AND JUST
THE COST OF LIVING ROSE,
IT BECAME HARDER AND HARDER
TO MAKE A LIVING ON,
ON THOSE KIND OF ACRES SO,
FARMERS STARTED TO DO
WHAT THE ONLY
THING THEY COULD DO
AND THAT'S FARM MORE,
AND FARM MORE.

New clips show modern machinery working in the fields.

The Narrator says THE SIMMONDS
FAMILY HAS BEEN FARMING
IN THE REDBERRY
REGION SINCE 1906.
ONE OF THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE'S
LARGEST EMPLOYERS,
THEY HAVE SIGNIFICANTLY
GROWN THEIR OPERATION
IN RECENT YEARS TO REMAIN
ECONOMICALLY VIABLE.

The caption changes to "Rick Simmonds. Owner. Golden Ridge Enterprises. Farmer." He’s in his mid-fifties. He has short hair and a moustache. He wears glasses, a black sweater and a matching jacket.

Rick says OUR FARM IS INVOLVED IN
FOUR OR FIVE MAJOR CROPS.
OF COURSE,
GOOD OLD SASKATCHEWAN WHEAT.
AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR,
WE HAVE USUALLY AROUND
22 GUYS WORKING HERE.
MANAGEMENT IS SO KEY
TO THIS BUSINESS.
AND THAT'S WHAT IT IS...
IT'S A BUSINESS LIKE
ANY OTHER BUSINESS.
YOU KNOW IT BECOMES A QUESTION
OF HOW LONG DO YOU
WANT TO STAY IN.
THERE ARE BIG CONGLOMERATES
THAT ARE BUYING UP LAND
LOOKING AT IT
AS AN INVESTMENT.
WILL THIS PLACE GO THAT WAY?
THAT WILL BE UP TO MY SON.

As Larry speaks, the screen shows footage of him going through the fields as well as machines working.

The Narrator says JOHN KINDRACHUK
IS RICK SIMMONDS'S
OLD BUSINESS PARTNER.
ANOTHER THIRD
GENERATION FARMER
IN THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
JOHN HAS CHOSEN A LESS
CONVENTIONAL PATH FOR HIS FARM.

The caption changes to "John Kindrachuk. Executive Director - Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve. Rancher." He’s in his late forties. He’s mostly bald with short dark hair on the temples and clean-shaven. He wears a blue sweater underneath a dark jacket.

John says I THINK RICK WANTED
TO GROW HIS FARM
A LOT MORE THAN WHAT I DID.
AND I THOUGHT,
"WELL, I CAN'T
FOLLOW THAT PATH."
SO THAT'S WHEN WE BASICALLY
WENT SEPARATE WAYS.
I GOT SMALLER.
HE GOT BIGGER.

As he speaks, the screen shows him going around the cows.

The Narrator says JOHN IS THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
OF THE REDBERRY
LAKE BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
AT HOME, HE IS CONVERTING
HIS GRAIN FIELDS
INTO NATIVE
PRAIRIE GRASSLAND.

John says THE NATIVE PRAIRIE
HAS SUSTAINED THIS LAND
AND THE WILDLIFE, THE BISON
AND IT ALWAYS SEEMED
TO REGENERATE ITSELF.


A new clip mixes old footage with new one showing the images of the country life. Machinery working in the fields and animals eating.

The Narrator says A CENTURY
OF INTENSIVE GRAIN FARMING
HAS LEFT JOHN'S PROPERTY
LACKING IN MANY
OF THE NUTRIENTS
FOUND IN HEALTHY SOIL.
SO JOHN IS USING CATTLE
TO RESTORE HIS LAND.

John says THE CATTLE ARE USED
AS A TOOL TO REPAIR IT,
PUTTING MORE FERTILIZER ON IT,
NATURAL FERTILIZER,
AND THAT'S WHAT
I WANT TO LEAVE
FOR SOMEBODY ELSE IN THE FUTURE,
SOME HEALTHY SOIL.
PROBABLY THE FARMERS IN THIS
AREA THINK THAT I AM NUTS.
I MIGHT BE MAKING A QUARTER
OF WHAT IT COULD BE
IF IT WAS GRAIN FARMED.
BUT TO ME IT'S ABOUT
DOING SOMETHING
THAT YOU FEEL GOOD DOING.
IT'S NOT ABOUT THE MONEY.

The Narrator says THE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT
AND SUSTAINABILITY STUDENTS
GET TO COME IN FROM
THE FIELD AND MEET WITH JOHN
AND OTHER MEMBERS
OF THE COMMUNITY
AT AN EVENT AT THE LOCAL BAR.

The caption changes to "Doctor Christy Morrissey. Associate Professor. School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan." She’s in her thirties. She has long brown hair in a ponytail and wears a dark grey sweater.

Christy says WE HAVE THE STUDENTS COME UP
WITH A LIST OF QUESTIONS
THAT THEY WOULD LIKE
TO ASK LOCAL FARMERS.
AND ONE OF THE FOCUS GROUPS
WAS TO BE HELD AT THE KAY BAR
WHICH IS THE LOCAL BAR
ON THE MAIN STREET,
IT'S THE TOWN HUB.

(music plays)

The screen shows people getting inside a bar where a group of men in their fifties plays music.

The caption changes to "Banjoko ‘Sharon’ Morounfayo. Student. School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan." She’s in her twenties. She has long dark hair tied up in the back and wears a violet turtleneck underneath a black jacket.

Banjoko says WE HAD A LOT OF CHATS WITH
THE FARMERS. AND WE WERE ABLE
TO KNOW THEIR CONCERNS.
AND THEY TOO THEMSELVES,
THEY FEEL THERE IS NEED FOR
SUSTAINABILITY.
AND THEY REALLY WISH THE
CONSUMERS WERE WELL
INFORMED ABOUT THE
IMPORTANCE OF SUSTAINABILITY.
SO THAT THEY TOO CAN ADVOCATE
FOR SUSTAINABILITY.

As she speaks, the screen shows footage of her and he colleagues talking to people inside the bar.

Anson says IN TERMS OF TALKING TO THEM,
YOU GET A LOT OF
VALUABLE INSIGHT.
YOU GET UNDERSTANDING
OF THE LANDSCAPE HISTORY,
HOW THINGS HAVE CHANGED,
TO THEN BE BETTER ABLE TO INFORM
ENVIRONMENTAL DECISIONS.

As they speak, the band keeps on playing music and the screen shows students talking to people and handing forms.

The Narrator says IF THE SENS STUDENTS
HOPE TO ONE DAY HELP
A REGION LIKE REDBERRY
BECOME MORE SUSTAINABLE,
LOOKING AT THE PAST
TO SEE WHAT HAS WORKED
AND WHAT HASN'T,
IS A GOOD PLACE TO START.

Next, aerial views of the lake and the zone appear on screen.

The Narrator continues
THE FACT THAT REDBERRY
IS A SALT LAKE,
HAS AFFECTED HOW PEOPLE
BUT OVER THE LAST CENTURY,
THE TREND HAS BEEN
FOR THE LAKE TO GET SALTIER
AS THE WATER LEVEL
HAS GONE DOWN.
REDBERRY'S SALINITY
IS TOO HIGH FOR DRINKING WATER,
AND TOO HIGH FOR ALL
BUT THE SMALLEST OF FISH.
SO PEOPLE HAVE
ALWAYS BEEN LIMITED
IN THE WAYS
THEY CAN USE THE LAKE.
BUT FOR THE REGIONS
FIRST PEOPLES,
THE PLAINS CREE,
THE FACT THAT REDBERRY
WASN'T HOME TO ANY FISH
DIDN'T REALLY MATTER.
THEY WERE MUCH MORE INTERESTED
IN THE BISON
THAT ONCE THRIVED HERE.

A series of drawings and paintings depict bisons in the area.

Next, the caption changes to "Doctor Bill Waiser. Professor Emeritus. Department of History. University of Saskatchewan." He’s in his fifties. He has short grey hair and is clean-shaven. He wears glasses, a blue shirt underneath a black and blue jacket.

Bill says FOR EARLY PEOPLES
LIVING ACROSS WESTERN CANADA,
REDBERRY LAKE WOULD'VE BEEN
PART OF THEIR SEASONAL CYCLE.
SO THEY WOULDN'T HAVE
LIVED HERE YEAR-ROUND,
BUT THEY WOULD HAVE
PASSED THROUGH THIS REGION.
SO THEY WOULD'VE BEEN HERE
PARTICULARLY IN THE SPRING
DURING THE SPRING
BIRD MIGRATION.
THEY WOULD HAVE COME
BACK ALSO IN THE FALL
BECAUSE OF FRUITS.
THEY MIGHT HAVE COME BACK
HERE IN THE WINTER
BECAUSE WE'RE SITTING
IN A DEPRESSION HERE.
REDBERRY LAKE IS IN A KETTLE.
SO BISON WOULD HAVE
MOVED OFF THE OPEN PLAINS
INTO SHELTERED AREAS
AND THAT'S WHERE FIRST PEOPLES
ALSO CAMPED.

As he speaks, a clip shows new paintings with bisons as well as the landscapes in the area covered in snow. A new clip shows a close up to trees with red berries.

The Narrator says THE BUFFALO BERRY,
AFTER WHICH REDBERRY IS NAMED,
GROWS IN ABUNDANCE
ON ITS SHORES.
THE PLAINS CREE
HAD A MULTITUDE OF USES
FOR THIS BITTER FRUIT.

The caption changes to "Vinessa Currie-Foster. Sixth Generation Canoe Guide." She’s in her thirties. She has long dark hair and wears a beige cap and a blue T-shirt.

Vinessa says THIS IS WHY IT'S CALLED
REDBERRY LAKE.
AS YOU CAN SEE,
THERE'S OVERABUNDANCE.
ANYONE COMING TO THIS AREA,
IT WOULD'VE BEEN A NATURAL WAY
TO NAME THE PLACE.
FIRST OF ALL,
THEY ATTRACTED THE MAIN SOURCE
OF FOOD OF THE NATIVE PEOPLE,
WHICH WAS THE BUFFALO.
AND THEY WOULD
POUND IT INTO THE MEAT
ALONG WITH SOME BEAR FAT
OR FISH FAT,
WHATEVER THEY HAD AROUND
TO PRESERVE IT.
BUT THEY HAD ALL SORTS
OF OTHER PURPOSES.
ONE THING IS THEY CAN
BE USED FOR SHAMPOO.

As she speaks, new images on screen show her collecting the fruits followed by new paintings depicting bisons.

Vinessa continues
THEY ALSO HAD SOME
MEDICINAL PURPOSES.
SO QUITE OFTEN
THEY WOULD SMASH THEM
INTO A POULTICE FOR BURNS,
FOR TREATMENTS.
THEY USED THEM FOR
INFLAMMATION,
FOR CONSTIPATION,
AND ALSO A VARIETY
OF VENEREAL DISEASES.
SO REALLY, A PRETTY
MULTIPURPOSE BERRY
FOR OUT HERE
ON THE PRAIRIES.

Black and white old pictures show a group of Native men posing with furs.

The Narrator says EUROPEANS FIRST
STARTED VISITING REDBERRY
BECAUSE OF THE FUR TRADE.
PERHAPS REDBERRY'S
MOST FAMOUS EARLY VISITOR
WAS SURVEYOR
DAVID THOMPSON.
THOMPSON PASSED THROUGH
THE REGION IN THE EARLY 1800s
ON HIS JOURNEY
FROM EASTERN CANADA
TO THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS.
HE MARKED 'REDBERRY HILL'
ON HIS ICONIC MAP
OF WHAT WOULD BECOME
WESTERN CANADA.

Vinessa appears on a canoe.

She says THOMPSON MARKS ABOUT
HOW DISGUSTING,
AND THAT'S NOT HIS TERM,
BUT HOW SALTY AND BITTER
AND ILL TASTING
THE WATER WAS HERE.
AND HE TALKS ABOUT
HOW THESE HILLS
USED TO BE FULL OF BUFFALO.
BUT ALSO FULL OF TENTS.
THERE IS MENTION IN HIS
JOURNALS OF SETTLEMENTS
THAT WERE HERE,
SOMETIMES UP TO 60 TEPEES.

The Narrator says TO THRIVE ON THE PRAIRIES,
THE PLAINS CREE DEVELOPED
A SUSTAINABLE SYMBIOTIC
RELATIONSHIP
WITH THE BISON
AND THE PRAIRIE LANDSCAPE.
THE CREE WOULD
BURN THE PRAIRIE,
ENCOURAGING FRESH GROWTH
THAT WOULD ATTRACT THE BISON
FOR EASIER HUNTING.
HUGE BISON HERDS
WOULD THEN DO THEIR PART,
KEEPING THE PRAIRIE HEALTHY
BY FERTILIZING THE GRASSES
WITH THEIR DROPPINGS
AND CARCASSES.

A series of images show the fields in flames and the animals running away.

Vinessa says THEY WOULD HAVE REGULAR PATHS
JUST LIKE THE CATTLE.
SO THEY WOULD ALL FOLLOW
THE SAME TRAILS.
AND THEY WOULD ACTUALLY BEAT
FURROWS INTO THE HILLS,
SO NATURAL DEPRESSIONS.
SO I OFTEN WONDER WHEN
I'M OUT HERE PADDLING,
ARE THOSE GLACIAL FEATURES,
ARE THOSE NATURAL FEATURES,
OR IS THAT WHAT'S LEFT
OF AN OLD BUFFALO TRAIL.
SO THE LANDSCAPE WOULD
HAVE BEEN LITERALLY,
PHYSICALLY CHANGED
BY THE BUFFALO.

The Narrator says AND BY LIGHTNING STRIKES
LIKELY WOULD HAVE MEANT
MORE PRAIRIE AND FEWER
TREES THAN WE SEE NOW
IN THE REDBERRY REGION.
IT'S EVEN POSSIBLE THAT
THE ASPEN PARKLAND ECOREGION,
THAT REDBERRY IS SITUATED IN,
MAY BE A FAIRLY
RECENT DEVELOPMENT.

Bill says THERE'S CONSIDERABLE
DEBATE AMONG SCIENTISTS
ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED
WHEN FIRES ENDED.
FIRES WOULD'VE RAGED ACROSS
WESTERN CANADA NATURALLY, OKAY?
AND THERE IS AN INTERPRETATION
THAT SUGGESTED
THAT THERE WASN'T
A PARKLAND REGION
THAT WE'RE FAMILIAR
WITH TODAY.

An animated clip shows the Saskatchewan Boreal forest in flames in the prairie area. The fire extinguishes progressively and the prairie is now next to the Aspen Parkland.

Bill continues
FIRES WOULD HAVE RAGED RIGHT
TO THE EDGE OF THE FOREST
BUT WITH THE COMING
OF TREATIES
AND WITH AGRICULTURAL
SENTIMENTAL THOSE FIRES
WOULD HAVE BEEN STOPPED
SO IT CREATES THIS
PARK LAND ENVIRONMENT,
THIS KIND OF THIRD ZONE
SO YOU THEN HAVE
PRAIRIE PARKLAND
AND BOREAL FOREST
THAT WE HAVE TODAY.

New old pictures show men posing and groups of hunters holding big furs.

The Narrator says AS OVER HUNTING BY EUROPEANS
NEARLY DROVE THE BUFFALO
TO EXTINCTION,
TREATY SIX WAS SIGNED BY
THE PLAINS CREE IN 1876.
THE CREE USING REDBERRY
EITHER MOVED TO ONE
OF THE RESERVES ESTABLISHED
IN CENTRAL SASKATCHEWAN
AS PART OF THE TREATY,
OR TO THE UNITED STATES.
IN THE LATE 1800s
THE REDBERRY REGION
WAS DECLARED AVAILABLE
FOR EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT
BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT.

(music plays)

Fast clips show the headlines of articles and notes in the newspapers. One of them reads "Free farms for the million." Following, a clip shows a group of immigrants and a man working in the fields.

The Narrator continues
MOST PEOPLE COMING TO CANADA
FOR CHEAP OR FREE FARM LAND
IN THE EARLY 1900S
WERE EXCITED BY THE EXPANSIVE,
FLAT AND TREELESS
SOUTHERN PRAIRIES.
BUT SOME SETTLERS,
ESPECIALLY THOSE FROM UKRAINE,
JUMPED AT THE CHANCE
TO OWN A PIECE
OF THE ASPEN PARKLAND
IN THE REDBERRY REGION.

Bill says WHEN WESTERN CANADA
WAS OPEN FOR SETTLEMENT
THEY PROMOTED THE OPEN PLAINS
FOR SETTLEMENT
BECAUSE YOU WOULDN'T HAVE
TO CLEAR THE LAND OF TREES.
BUT PEOPLE FROM EUROPE WHO
CAME FROM TEMPERATE ENVIRONMENTS
WHO WERE LOOKING FOR
A TREED ENVIRONMENT
WHERE THEY WOULD HAVE
TREES TO FALL BACK ON,
A VARIETY OF RESOURCES
IF THINGS DIDN'T WORK OUT.
SO A LARGE NUMBER OF UKRAINIANS
MOVED TO THIS AREA,
DOUKHOBORS,
ETCETERA, ETCETERA.
THEY PRACTICED MIXED FARMING,
NOT OPEN GRAIN,
OR WHAT'S CALLED OPEN GRAIN,
OR STRAIGHT WHEAT FARMING.

(music plays)

The Narrator says BY 1921, THERE WERE MORE
THAN 2000 UKRAINIAN SETTLERS
IN THE REDBERRY REGION,
INCLUDING THE HARACH FAMILY.

A new clip shows a band with men playing instruments.

The caption changes to "Paul Harach. Retired Farmer and Musician." He’s in his mid-sixties. He’s mostly bald with dark hair on the temples and a moustache. He wears glasses and a long-sleeve polo shirt.

Paul says MY FATHER AND MOTHER
CAME TO CANADA IN 1908.
160 ACRES FOR TEN DOLLARS...
MY, WHAT A BUY.
AS THEY ARRIVED,
THINGS WASN'T ROSY.
THEY SUFFERED.

As he speaks, the screen mixes footage of him playing a saxophone and old pictures of his family.

Paul continues
THE FIRST WINTER,
THEY BUILT A BOUDA.
THIS WAS BASICALLY
A HOLE IN THE GROUND
AGAINST THE HILL
AND PARTLY COVERED WITH SOD
BY THE SECOND YEAR THEY
BUILT A TWO ROOM HOUSE
WITH A STRAW THATCHED ROOF
AND THAT'S THE WAY
THEY STARTED.

The caption changes to "Margaret Lommer. "Retired farmer." She’s in her sixties. She has short grey hair and wears glasses and a pink sweater. As she speaks, the screen shows pictures of old documents as well as images of her family when they first got to the city.

Margaret says THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA
WAS ADVERTISING WORLDWIDE
FOR SETTLERS TO COME
AND SETTLE WESTERN CANADA.
MY DAD JUST ANSWERED THE CALL.
HE WAS A MAN WHO
LOVED TO GO FISHING
AND HE THOUGHT WOW,
I WANT TO SETTLE BY THIS LAKE.
YOU CAN IMAGINE HIS
DISAPPOINTMENT WHEN HE FOUND
THAT THERE WERE NO FISH
IN REDBERRY LAKE.

Paul says WE WERE ALL GRAIN FARMERS
WITH A LITTLE BIT OF HOGS
AND SOME CATTLE
AND IF YOU HAVE A SPARE STEER
THAT WAS A LITTLE EXTRA.
MOM GOT SOME MONEY
OUT OF THE CHICKEN EGGS
FOR THE GROCERY.

New old family pictures appear on screen.

Margaret says WE HAD MOST OF OUR OWN FOOD
RIGHT HERE ON THE FARM.
THERE'S NOTHING BETTER
THAN WHAT WE WERE RAISED ON.
IT TASTED SO GOOD.

Bill says IT WOULD'VE TAKEN THEM LONGER
TO GO FROM
A PIONEER FARM OPERATION
TO A COMMERCIAL OPERATION
BUT AT LEAST, COME THE 1930s,
OR OTHER DIFFICULT YEARS,
THEY HAD OTHER
RESOURCES TO FALL BACK ON
AND WERE NOT SIMPLY RELIANT
ON ONE CROP, WHEAT.

The Narrator says THE DIVERSE, MIXED FARMING
PRACTICED BY EARLY
REDBERRY FARMERS
WAS A PERFECT FIT
FOR THE PARKLAND ENVIRONMENT.
IT HAD AN ADDED BONUS
OF MAKING THEM MORE RESILIENT
THAN THEIR NEIGHBOURS
TO THE SOUTH.
BUT PEOPLE ALWAYS WONDERED
HOW REDBERRY LAKE ITSELF
MIGHT FIT INTO
THE REGION'S ECONOMIC MIX.
SO IT'S NOT SURPRISING
HOW EXCITED EVERYONE WAS
WHEN THE GOVERNMENT
STARTED TESTING
THE 'SALINE LAKES
OF SASKATCHEWAN'
TO SEE IF ANY OF THEM
COULD SUPPORT FISH.
THE TESTS REVEALED
THAT REDBERRY
WAS LIKELY FRESH
ENOUGH TO SUPPORT
SOME NATIVE SASKATCHEWAN
FISH SPECIES.

New clips on screen show people studying samples of water, charts with values for the chemical composition of the water and men in groups fishing in the lake.

The Narrator continues
STARTING IN 1940,
MILLIONS OF WHITEFISH FRY
WERE PLANTED,
OR STOCKED, IN THE LAKE.

Paul says FISH IN REDBERRY LAKE
WAS LIKE A NEW BEGINNING.
THE FISHING WAS SO GOOD
THAT THEY DEVELOPED
A FISHERIES COMPANY
AT THE LAKE.
AND EVERYBODY
SURROUNDING THE LAKE
WAS GOING TO BE A FISHER.
OUR NEIGHBORS WERE
PULLING THEIR FISH OUT,
AND THEY WERE GETTING
UP TO 300 FISH
FOR 100 YARDS.
AND WE THOUGHT OH MY GOD
SO WE START
PULLING OUR NET.
BUT HOW WERE WE
SUPPOSED TO KNOW
YOU'RE SUPPOSED TO DROP
THE NET DOWN TO THE BOTTOM
OF THE LAKE
WHERE THE FISH IS.
WELL THAT WAS
A LEARNING EXPERIENCE
WE NEVER GOT OUR 300
BUT WE WERE UP TO 200
AND SOMETHING AT ONE TIME.

New black and white images show fishermen at work.

The Narrator says FOR A WHILE,
THE REDBERRY WHITEFISH FISHERY
WAS IMPORTANT
TO THE LOCAL ECONOMY.
BUT AS TIME WENT ON,
IT BECAME APPARENT
THAT THE FISHERY
WASN'T SUSTAINABLE.

Larry says WELL, THE FISH
BASICALLY DISAPPEARED
BECAUSE OF SALINITY.
THEY NEVER DID REPRODUCE HERE.
SO AS LONG AS THEY KEPT THROWING
THEM IN THERE EVERY YEAR,
THERE'D BE SOMETHING TO CATCH.
BUT AS THE WATER LEVEL DROPPED,
THE SALINITY KEPT GOING UP
HIGHER AND HIGHER AND HIGHER,
UNTIL IT GOT TO THE POINT
WHERE THE LAST TEST NETTING
THEY DID THEY WERE PULLING
OUT NINE YEAR OLD FISH
BUT THEY ONLY
WEIGHED TWO POUNDS.

The Narrator says BY THE EARLY 80s,
REDBERRY LAKE WAS ONCE AGAIN
DEVOID OF FISH.
AND IN THE SURROUNDING
FARMLANDS,
PEOPLE WERE IN THE MIDST
OF A DIFFICULT ECONOMIC SHIFT.

Bill says WHAT'S HAPPENED IN THIS REGION
SINCE THE SECOND WORLD WAR
IS THE MOVEMENT TOWARDS
LARGER LAND HOLDINGS,
MORE USE OF MACHINERY
AND GOING HAND IN HAND
WITH THAT HAS BEEN
RURAL DEPOPULATION.
MANY OF THOSE MARGINAL FARMS
CAN NO LONGER KEEP UP
THEY CANNOT MEET
THE PRODUCTION COSTS
AND SO THEY GO UNDER
AND SO A LOT OF PEOPLE
ARE MOVING TO CITIES
IN SASKATCHEWAN,
IN FACT SASKATCHEWAN TODAY
IS TWO THIRDS URBAN.

New footage show images of the city in the 60s.

The Narrator says THE MOVE TO CITIES
MEANT THAT SMALL RURAL
COMMUNITIES LIKE REDBERRY
WERE SUFFERING
ECONOMICALLY.
BUT IT ALSO MEANT
THAT MORE URBAN PEOPLE
BEGAN TO VALUE PLACES LIKE
REDBERRY AS TOURISM SITES.
IN 1968, THE REDBERRY
LAKE REGIONAL PARK OPENED,
MAKING PUBLIC ACCESS
TO THE LAKE EASIER.
IN 1985, AN EXCITING RESORT
DEVELOPMENT PROPOSAL,
THAT INCLUDED A TROUT FISHERY,
BEGAN TO CIRCULATE
IN THE COMMUNITY.

The screen shows a picture of an article in the newspaper about trout fishery where a man holds a big map.

Larry says THERE WAS AN
ANNOUNCEMENT OR A FRONT PAGE
IN THE STAR PHOENIX
IN SASKATOON
THAT THE BIGGEST TROUT
FISHERY EAST OF THE ROCKIES
WAS GOING TO BE ESTABLISHED
AT REDBERRY LAKE,
AND SO WE KIND OF GO,
"OH YA, REALLY?"

The Narrator says MANY PEOPLE FOUND IT ODD
THAT THE PROPOSAL INCLUDED
GIVEN REDBERRY'S
HISTORY WITH FISH.
BUT, NO MATTER -
MAYBE THIS 400 COTTAGE
AND RESORT DEVELOPMENT
WOULD HELP STIMULATE
THE STAGNATING
LOCAL ECONOMY.

Larry says A FEW PEOPLE
STARTED WONDERING,
"WELL, ISN'T THIS
A BIT UM, OVER THE TOP?"
THE LAKE WAS A FEDERAL
BIRD SANCTUARY.

The Narrator says HERE'S WHERE
START TO PLAY INTO THE STORY.
THE DEVELOPMENT
WAS TO BE LOCATED
RIGHT NEXT TO THE PELICAN'S
NESTING ISLANDS.
THE SLIGHTEST DISTURBANCE
TO A COLONY OF NESTING PELICANS
CAN MEAN BIG TROUBLE
TO THE SKITTISH BIRDS.

Peter says AND IT'S NOT THAT THEY
JUST DON'T LIKE COMPANY.
WHAT HAPPENS IS THEY
LIFT OFF THEIR NESTS,
AND THEN FLY AROUND
FOR A LITTLE WHILE.
AND THAT'S NOT A GOOD IDEA,
BECAUSE IF THEY'RE
INCUBATING THEIR EGGS,
THEY'RE EITHER GOING TO
FRY THEM IN THE SUNSHINE
OR FREEZE THEM IN THE COLD.
AND THE OTHER THING
THAT HAPPENS
IS THEY ALWAYS SEEM
TO NEST IN ASSOCIATION
WITH A COLONY OF GULLS,
AND THE GULLS ARE MUCH
MORE AGGRESSIVE,
AND THEY WILL ALL
LIFT OFF TOGETHER,
BUT THE GULLS
ARE THE FIRST IN.
AND, SO THEN YOU'VE GOT,
UM, YOU KNOW, INSTANT OMELET.

As Peter speaks, the screen shows new footage of the birds in the area.

Larry says SO I MEAN
IT WOULD HAVE REALLY BEEN
A DISASTROUS
SITUATION FOR THEM
BECAUSE AT THE TIME
THEY WERE A THREATENED SPECIES.
I THINK WE WERE DOWN
TO MAYBE A HUNDRED PAIR,
FIFTY PAIR
OF NESTING BIRDS HERE.

The Narrator says PRESSURE FROM PEOPLE CONCERNED
ABOUT THE POTENTIAL IMPACT
OF A RESORT SO CLOSE
TO THE THREATENED
PELICAN COLONIES
EVENTUALLY LEAD
THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
TO STOP THE DEVELOPMENT.

New newspaper articles appear on screen. One of them titled "Redberry complex may never become reality."

The Narrator continues
WHILE THIS DECISION UPSET MANY
IN THE ECONOMICALLY
STRUGGLING COMMUNITY,
IT ALSO PROMPTED A DISCUSSION
ABOUT THE ROLE OF NATURE
IN REDBERRY'S FUTURE.

Larry says THE THING THAT,
REALLY GOOD THAT CAME OUT
THAT WHOLE PROCESS WAS THAT
THERE WAS A ZONING BYLAW
PASSED BY THE RURAL
MUNICIPALITY
THAT PROTECTED
THE CORE AREA OF THE LAKE
FROM DEVELOPMENT.

Peter says THERE WAS A LOT OF BITTERNESS,
PEOPLE FELT THAT THEY WERE
KIND OF DONE OUT OF THAT
BY THE ENVIRONMENTALISTS
AND ALL THAT KIND OF STUFF.
SO THE REDBERRY PELICAN
PROJECT WAS CONCEIVED
BY TWO OR THREE
OF US IN RESPONSE
KIND OF TRY TO FIND
SOME ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE
FOR THE COMMUNITY WHEN
IT FELT SO BADLY ABOUT LOSING
WHAT IT THOUGHT WAS
THIS CABIN DEVELOPMENT.
ECOTOURISM WAS ALMOST
JUST BECOMING A WORD
THAT PEOPLE UNDERSTOOD.
SO WE KIND OF JUMPED ON
THAT BANDWAGON SO TO SPEAK,
AND TRIED TO
CONCEIVE OF WAYS
TO BRING PEOPLE HERE.

Pictures on screen show tourists watching the pelicans as well as fishermen at work.

The Narrator says THE PELICAN
WAS THE MAIN ATTRACTION,
BUT BECAUSE VISITORS COULDN'T
GO NEAR THE PELICAN ISLANDS,
THE PELICAN PROJECT
INSTALLED A STATE OF THE ART,
HIDDEN REMOTE DIGITAL
VIDEO CAMERA SYSTEM,
ALLOWING VISITORS
TO GET A CLOSE-UP VIEW
OF THE PELICAN COLONY WITHOUT
ACTUALLY DISTURBING THEM.
THE PELICANS DIDN'T SEEM
TO MIND THE ATTENTION,
AS THEIR NUMBERS INCREASED
FROM 300 NESTING PAIRS
IN THE LATE 1980s
TO ABOUT 1200 PAIRS IN 2000.
THE PELICAN PROJECT
WAS TWICE HONOURED
BY WINNING BRITISH AIRWAYS
"TOURISM OF TOMORROW."
SUSTAINABLE TOURISM AWARD.

Peter says THE REDBERRY
PELICAN PROJECT WENT AHEAD
WITH TRYING TO WORK
TOWARDS DESIGNATION
AS A BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
TO GIVE SOME, I MEAN AT
THE TIME WE WERE THINKING OF IT
IN TERMS OF SIMPLY
GIVING THE COMMUNITY
SOME PRIDE IN WHO THEY ARE.

Larry says SASKATCHEWAN HAD TRIED
TO ESTABLISH
TWO BIOSPHERE RESERVES
BUT THEY WERE BOTH TURNED DOWN
BECAUSE THEY DIDN'T GET
THE PEOPLE ON THE GROUND ONSIDE.
WHEREAS WE MANAGED TO DO IT
BY HAVING THE PEOPLE
ON THE GROUND ON SIDE,
HAVING OUR OWN
MUNICIPALITY SIGN ON,
HAVING THE TOWNS
IN THE AREA SIGN ON,
AND THIS IS SOMETHING
I BELIEVE
UNESCO IS REALLY
LOOKING FOR.

New pictures on screen show a crowd gathered in the event of the inauguration of the Reserve.

The Narrator says UP UNTIL THIS POINT,
MOST BIOSPHERE RESERVES
IN CANADA WERE DRIVEN
BY PARKS CANADA
OR A UNIVERSITY.
WHEN REDBERRY LAKE
BECAME A BIOSPHERE RESERVE
IN EARLY 2000, IT WAS ONE
OF THE FIRST COORDINATED
ENTIRELY BY
THE LOCAL COMMUNITY.

New clips show the group of students working in the zone while collecting new samples to be studied.

The Narrator continues
ONE SITE NOW FREQUENTED
BY THE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT
AND SUSTAINABILITY STUDENTS
DURING THEIR FIELD COURSE,
IS THE VERY SPOT ONCE EARMARKED
FOR RESORT DEVELOPMENT.
THIS LOCATION IS PERFECT
FOR LEARNING ABOUT
THE IDENTIFICATION
AND MANAGEMENT
OF NATIVE PRAIRIE GRASSES,
WHICH ARE NOW VERY RARE
IN SASKATCHEWAN
BUT ARE KEY TO THE SURVIVAL
OF MANY BIRD SPECIES.

Christy says SOME OF THE SPECIES THAT ARE
MOST AFFECTED BY AGRICULTURE
TEND TO BE THE GRASSLAND BIRDS.
AND ALL OVER THE WORLD,
WE'RE SEEING THESE VERY STEEP
POPULATION DECLINES.
AND SOME OF THE LINKS
ARE TO CHANGES
IN THEIR HABITATS,
THE LOSS OF GRASSES
THAT ARE BEING CONVERTED
AT A RAPID RATE
TO AGRICULTURE.
THE HIGH USE OF PESTICIDES,
WHICH ARE SEVERELY
IMPACTING INDIVIDUAL SPECIES
SOME OF THE SEED EATING BIRDS.
SO WE REALLY
NEED SOME AREAS
WHERE THERE IS
SOME GRASSLANDS
THAT ARE BEING
MAINTAINED IN ORDER
TO KEEP SOME
OF THOSE POPULATIONS.
SO WE ARE TRYING TO GIVE
THE STUDENTS HANDS ON TRAINING
IN IDENTIFYING PLANTS,
THE KEY GRASSES
THAT ARE IMPORTANT AND RARE,
AND HOW TO MANAGE
THE GRASSLANDS TO AT LEAST MIMIC
WHAT IT WOULD BE
FOR FIRE AND FOR BISON
THAT WOULD HAVE GRAZED
HERE FOR CENTURIES.

Clips on screen show new bird species mixed with some of the students collecting little branches from the local plants.

The Narrator says ONE PLACE
THAT THE STUDENTS VISIT TO SEE
AN EXAMPLE OF NATIVE
PRAIRIE STEWARDSHIP
IS RAFTER Y RANCH.

The caption changes to "Darcy Yasieniuk. Rancher and Farmer." She’s in her late thirties. She has short dark hair and wears a dark jeans shirt and blue jeans.

Darcy says WE RANCH, LIKE EVERYONE,
FOR PROFIT.
IT'S VERY IMPORTANT, OF COURSE.
BUT WE ALSO CONSIDER OURSELVES
VERY SERIOUS STEWARDS
OF THE LAND.

The caption changes to "Brian Yasieniuk. Rancher and Farmer." He’s in his mid-forties. He has short dark hair and a moustache. He wears a cowboy hat, a plaid red shirt and a striped green coat.

Brian says WE'RE LUCKY ENOUGH
TO HAVE ABOUT 250 ACRES OF
ROUGH FESCUE ON OUR LAND.
AND WE TRY TO CONSERVE IT
AS MUCH AS WE CAN.
WE SEPARATE IT FROM
OUR TAME GRASSES,
SO WE CAN GRAZE IT
AT DIFFERENT INTERVALS
AND DIFFERENT
TIMES OF THE YEAR.
WE DO A MOB GRAZING METHOD,
WHICH IS SIMILAR TO
WHAT THE BUFFALOS
USED TO GRAZE IT
HUNDREDS OF YEARS AGO.
AND WE LEAVE A LITTLE BIT
OF GRASS ON THE GROUND,
SO THAT IT PROTECTS
THE SOIL FROM EROSION
AND GIVES IT A LITTLE PROTECTION
FOR THE NEXT CYCLE.

As he speaks, the screen shows footage of his ranch as well as the staff working.

Brian continues
IT HAS HELPED OUR BOTTOM LINE
TO KEEP THE CATTLE
OUT LONGER BECAUSE WHEN
YOU MOVE THEM AROUND
INTO DIFFERENT PADDOCKS
THEN IT SAVES GRASS
FOR LATER SEASONS
WITH EXTENDED GRAZING.
WE'VE USED THIS METHOD
FOR ABOUT 12 YEARS NOW,
AND WE'VE REALLY SEEN
HOW IT'S IMPROVED
THE YIELD OF THE LAND.
IT DOES PRODUCE MORE BEEF
PER ACRE AND BROUGHT BACK
A LOT MORE TO
THE NATIVE PRAIRIE.
MY GRANDFATHER SETTLED
10 MILES NORTH OF HERE.
SO IT IS REALLY SPECIAL FOR ME
TO STILL BE IN THIS AREA,
AND KINDA PICTURE
WHAT MY GRANDFATHER CAME TO
WHEN THE LAND WAS LIKE THAT.

Darcy says I FEEL IT'S PART
OF OUR HERITAGE
AND YOU KNOW WE'RE RAISING
FOUR CHILDREN HERE ON THE RANCH
AND IT’S VERY IMPORTANT
TO MAINTAIN IT
FOR OUR CHILDREN,
OUR CHILDREN'S CHILDREN
AND I WHOLE HEARTEDLY
BELIEVE THAT
AND LIVE BY THAT.

The Narrator says FOR HELP IN MAKING
THEIR RANCH MORE SUSTAINABLE,
THE YASIENIUKS
TURNED TO THE LOCAL
BIOSPHERE RESERVE ASSOCIATION.
THE ASSOCIATION
OFFERS FUNDING TO LANDOWNERS
WHO UNDERTAKE PROJECTS THAT
ENHANCE THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT,
WHILE ALSO MAKING
THEIR LAND MORE PROFITABLE.

John says WELL, HERE ON BRIAN
AND DARCY'S FARM,
THEY HAVE VERY CLASSICAL,
MARGINAL, SANDY SOIL.
A LOT OF IT WAS
GRAIN FARMED
AND NOT REALLY
PRODUCING A CROP.
HE COULD SEE THE POTENTIAL
OF TURNING THIS LAND
INTO A GOOD CATTLE RANCH.
AND THE PROJECTS
THAT WE DID WITH HIM
FROM ALL THE FENCING THAT
HE WAS ABLE TO ACCOMPLISH,
PORTABLE WINDBREAKS,
PORTABLE CALF SHELTERS.
AND HE WAS ABLE TO GET HIS
CATTLE OUT ON THE LAND
AND FEED THEM THERE
AND THEY'VE BEEN ABLE
TO BUILD THEIR LAND,
AND PROBABLY,
GET THEIR CARRYING CAPACITY
AT LEAST FOUR TIMES GREATER
THAN WHAT IT WAS
WHEN THEY STARTED.

Images on screen show John meeting with Brian in the ranch.

Brian says LIVING IN THE REDBERRY
LAKE BIOSPHERE,
I THINK WE WERE VERY LUCKY,
BEING ABLE TO LIVE
SOMEWHERE WHERE OTHER
PEOPLE THINK THE SAME WAY.
AND THAT GROUP IS GROWING
AND GROWING EVERY YEAR.

The Narrator says THE YASIENIUKS ARE PART OF
A SMALL BUT GROWING NUMBER
WHO ARE COMING UP WITH
NEW WAYS TO KEEP THEIR
FAMILIES IN REDBERRY
WHILE ENHANCING THE HEALTH
OF THEIR LAND AT THE SAME TIME.
IT'S A TREND THAT
DOCTOR MAUREEN REED
FROM THE UNIVERSITY
OF SASKATCHEWAN,
WHO HAS BEEN STUDYING
THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE
SINCE ITS DESIGNATION,
IS PAYING CLOSE ATTENTION TO.

The caption changes to "Doctor Maureen Reed. Assistant Director - School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan." She’s in her fifties. She has short dark brown hair in a bob and wears a patterned scarf and a pale pink blouse.

Maureen says WHEN I STARTED DOING
RESEARCH IN THE EARLY 2000s...
YOUNG PEOPLE,
WHEN THEY WENT TO UNIVERSITY,
THEY STAYED AWAY.
SO WHAT'S INTERESTING NOW
IS THAT WE'RE STARTING TO SEE
YOUNG PEOPLE
WHO HAVE MOVED AWAY,
AND THEN HAVE DECIDED
TO RETURN BACK.

Bill says YOU'VE GOT A YOUNGER
GENERATION OF FARMERS
WILLING TO EXPERIMENT,
GETTING AWAY FROM THE OLD WAY
OF SIMPLY PLANTING WHEAT
AND HARVESTING WHEAT.
The Narrator says SOME ARE USING THE LAND
MORE LIKE THE SETTLERS DID
BEFORE THE SHIFT
TO INDUSTRIAL AGRICULTURE.
AFTER LIVING IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
THE KING FAMILY DECIDED
TO MOVE BACK TO REDBERRY
AND DO SOMETHING
ALTOGETHER UNSUSPECTED
IN SASKATCHEWAN -
START A MARKET GARDEN.

The caption changes to "Ian King. Market Gardener. Northwood Farm." He’s in his thirties. He has short dark blond hair and a beard. He wears glasses, a grey long-sleeve T-shirt underneath a matching shirt.

As he speaks, the screen shows footage of the garden and the vegetables they produce.

Ian says WE MARKET GARDEN
ON ABOUT AN ACRE AND A HALF.
WE GROW MIXED VEGETABLES,
BROCCOLI, KALE,
TOMATOES, CUCUMBERS,
STRAWBERRIES, CORN.
YOU NAME IT WE GROW IT.
IT'S CERTAINLY NOT A NORMAL
THING TO DO IN SASKATCHEWAN.
IT'S GOING ABOUT
AS WE'VE KIND OF EXPECTED IT TO
FOR THE FIRST YEAR GETTING
A NEW PIECE OF GROUND READY.
IT'S NICE HAVING
A UNIVERSITY TOWN CLOSE BY.
WE CHOSE THIS
AS A LIFESTYLE
AND WE THINK IT'S GREAT
FOR OUR KIDS
TO BE OUT HERE LEARNING
TO GROW UP THIS WAY.
I GROW ORGANICALLY BECAUSE
IT'S THE WAY I LIKE TO DO IT.
SO FOR WEED CONTROL
WE HAVE OUR FLAME WEEDER.
IT ALMOST WORKS EXACTLY
LIKE A PESTICIDE WOULD
BUT WITHOUT ACTUALLY
APPLYING ANY PESTICIDE.
THE BASIS OF MY PEST
AND DISEASE CONTROL
IS TO HAVE HEALTHY PLANTS.
IT'S JUST LIKE US,
THE HEALTHIER WE ARE
THE LESS WE HAVE TO
GET MEDICATION,
ANYTHING LIKE THAT.
SO I WENT TO A HORTICULTURE
SCHOOL IN VICTORIA.
WE WERE CERTIFIED
PESTICIDE APPLICATORS.
THE FIRST TIME I APPLIED IT
WAS AT THE SCHOOL,
I HAD A WEEK-END
MAINTENANCE JOB.
AND SO I HAD TO GO ALONG,
CLEANING UP PATHWAYS
WITH ROUND-UP AND SO,
WALKING ALONG, SPRAYING,
YOU KNOW, COME ALONG
AND I'LL ACCIDENTALLY SPRAY
SOME OF THESE BEAUTIFUL
LITTLE TREE FROGS
YOU KNOW LIVE ON SOUTHERN
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
YOU KNOW, TOTALLY
CHANGED MY PERSPECTIVE.
PRETTY MUCH SET ME ON MY PATH
THAT I WAS GOING ON, FOR SURE.

New footage shows Ian taking care of the plantation.

The Narrator says IAN'S DECISION
BY AVOIDING THE USE
OF PESTICIDES
IS AN UNUSUAL ONE
HERE IN SASKATCHEWAN,
WHERE WIDESPREAD
INDUSTRIAL AGRICULTURE
MEANS THAT MORE PESTICIDES
ARE USED HERE
THAN IN ANY OTHER PROVINCE.

Christy says THE TREATED SEEDS THAT ARE USED
HAVE AN INSECTICIDE ON THEM
THAT ARE ACTUALLY TOXIC TO
BIRDS THAT CONSUME THEM.
AND THE INSECTICIDES
AND THE HERBICIDES
GET INTO THE WATER
AND THOSE EFFECT
THE AQUATIC FAUNA THAT ARE THERE
WHICH MANY BIRDS
ARE DEPENDENT ON.

The Narrator says JUST BECAUSE
PEOPLE USE PESTICIDES,
DOESN'T NECESSARILY MEAN
THAT THEY WANT TO USE THEM.
LARRY HAWRYSH TRIED
ORGANIC GRAIN FARMING
IN THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
BUT WAS FORCED TO RETURN
HIS FARM TO HIGHER YIELD
CONVENTIONAL FARMING
WHEN HE WAS UNABLE
TO MAKE A PROFIT.

Larry appears on screen driving a truck.

Larry says SPRAYING IS SOMETHING
I JUST HATED DOING.
DURING SPRING SEASON,
IF I WASN'T SLEEPING,
I GUESS WAS SPRAYING.
AND IN 2000,
WE DECIDED TO GO ORGANIC
AND STARTED GROWING
ORGANIC GRAIN.
AFTER THE ECONOMIC
MELTDOWN IN 2008, '09,
THE ORGANIC MARKET REALLY
COLLAPSED FOR A FEW YEARS.
AND WE KINDA HUNG ON, HUNG ON,
AND WE JUST COULDN'T GET
THE THING TO CASH FLOW ANYMORE.
SO TWO YEARS AGO
WE DECIDED TO GO BACK
TO CONVENTIONAL GRAIN GROWING
AND STARTED TO USE,
AS THEY CALL THE TECHNOLOGIES
THAT ARE INVOLVED IN THAT.
THESE DECISIONS
AREN'T MADE LIGHTLY,
BUT I GUESS YOU MAKE 'EM
AND THEN YOU LIVE WITH
THE RESULTS.

Christy says I THINK FARMERS HAVE
A BIG ROLE TO PLAY.
WE NEED TO DO
A BETTER JOB LISTENING
TO WHAT THEIR ISSUES ARE.
THEY HAVE A TOUGH, TOUGH JOB
TO TRY AND MAKE A LIVING
HERE IN THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
BUT EVERYWHERE.
SO HOPEFULLY WE CAN WORK
TOGETHER TO SHOW THEM
THERE ARE OTHER WAYS
TO MANAGE THE LAND,
BOTH CROP LAND
AND RANCH LAND,
TO BENEFIT WILDLIFE
AND TO BENEFIT BIODIVERSITY.

Larry says WE VIEW OURSELVES
AS A TEST PLACE,
WE DON'T MIND FAILING.
BECAUSE THAT AT LEAST
TELLS OTHER COMMUNITIES
WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T,
WHICH IS WHAT
BIOSPHERE RESERVES
WERE SUPPOSED TO DO
IN THE FIRST PLACE.

The Narrator says UNESCO BIOSPHERE RESERVES
ARE A WORLDWIDE NETWORK
OF 'LABORATORIES
OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT'.
SINCE ITS DESIGNATION
AS A BIOSPHERE RESERVE,
PEOPLE FROM AROUND THE GLOBE
ARE COMING TO LEARN
FROM THE RESIDENTS
OF REDBERRY,
AND TO SHARE THEIR OWN
STORIES AND SOLUTIONS
WITH THE PEOPLE HERE.

The caption changes to "Kenji Kitamura. Project Researcher. Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Japan." He’s in his forties. He has short dark hair and is clean-shaven. He wears a blue shirt.

As he speaks, the screen shows aerial views of the area as well as farmers feeding the animals.

Kenji says I COME FROM JAPAN,
AND I'M WORKING ON A PROJECT
OF RESEARCH THAT IS FOCUSING
ON SO-CALLED INTEGRATED LOCAL
ENVIRONMENTAL KNOWLEDGE.
AND REDBERRY LAKE IS
ONE OF THE KEY CASES
THAT WE'RE STUDYING.
AND WHAT STRIKES ME
MOST IS THE DIVERSITY
OF PRACTICES CARRIED
OUT IN THE AREA.
THERE ARE LARGE
FARMS OF COURSE,
AND COMING FROM A SMALL
COUNTRY LIKE JAPAN,
IT'S SOMETIMES EVEN HARD
TO IMAGINE THE SCALE
THAT YOU HAVE HERE IN CANADA.
AND YET THERE'S A SMALL FARM,
WHERE THEY GROW
JUST A LITTLE BIT,
AMOUNT EACH OF MANY KINDS
OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.
AND I HAVE
VISITED A RANGE
WHERE THEY RAISE CATTLE
AND HORSES IN A WAY
THAT KEEPS HEALTHY,
NOT ONLY THOSE ANIMALS,
BUT THE GRASSLAND WITH
NATIVE PLANT SPECIES.

Brian says ONE OF THE REALLY
POSITIVE POINTS WE HAVE,
LIVING IN THE BIOSPHERE,
IS THAT WE'RE LUCKY ENOUGH
TO GET DELEGATIONS
FROM CHINA AND JAPAN
COMING TO OUR FARM,
OUR RANCH.

The caption changes to "Rayna Yasieniuk. Student. Hafford Central School." She’s in her teenage years. She has long brown hair in a single braid and wears a brown hat, a plaid pink shirt and jeans.

Rayna says IT'S CRAZY HOW THEY JUST COME
OUT HERE JUST TO SEE US
AND SEE HOW WE LIVE.

Brian says ONE OF THE BIG BENEFITS OF THAT
IS WHEN OUR CHILDREN LISTEN
TO WHAT THEY THINK
OF WHAT WE ARE DOING,
IT'S GREAT TO SEE THAT,
IN THEIR EYES, HOW LUCKY WE ARE
TO LIVE WHERE WE LIVE,
AND BEING ABLE
TO BE PART OF
SOMETHING SO GREAT.

Kenji says IT'S NOT THAT THE PEOPLE
FROM THE UNITED NATIONS
SUDDENLY CAME ONE DAY
HERE TO DECLARE
THAT THIS WOULD BE
A BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
NO.
IT'S THE LOCAL PEOPLE,
WHO FOUND A BIOSPHERE RESERVE
TO BE A USEFUL FRAMEWORK
THAT WOULD FIT
INTO THEIR PURPOSE
OF ACHIEVING
THE SUSTAINABLE
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.
SO WE ARE VERY MUCH INTERESTED
IN THIS DYNAMIC PROCESS
AND WE LIKE TO TAKE PART,
SO LEARNING TOGETHER
IS OUR GOAL.

New videos show people gathering in different zones around the lake.

The Narrator says REDBERRY'S BIGGEST
INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
SO FAR HAS BEEN
A KNOWLEDGE-SHARING AGREEMENT
WITH THE RHON BIOSPHERE RESERVE
IN GERMANY.
TODAY, THE RHON BIOSPHERE
HEAD ADMINISTRATOR,
KARL-FRIEDRICH,
IS IN REDBERRY TO HELP LAUNCH
A NEW DISCOVERY TRAIL.
MODELED AFTER A SIMILAR
TRAIL IN GERMANY,
THE DISCOVERY TRAIL
INCLUDES A SERIES OF STATIONS
THAT NOT ONLY
OFFER INTERPRETATION,
BUT ENHANCED WILDLIFE HABITAT
AND EASY TO FOLLOW PLANS
FOR VISITORS TO CONSTRUCT
THEIR OWN HABITATS.
IN REDBERRY LAKE,
THE CONCEPT HAS BEEN MODIFIED
TO ASSIST LOCAL SPECIES.

The caption changes to "Karl-Friedrich Abe. Head of Administration Rhön Biosphere Reserve, Germany." He’s in his fifties. He has short dark grey hair and a moustache. He wears a blue shirt.

Karl says THAT IS THE VALUE OF THIS WORLD
NETWORK: TO EXCHANGE IDEAS AND
TO BUILD ON THEM.
THAT IS THE TRUE VALUE OF THE WORLD
NETWORK OF BIOSPHERE
RESERVES.

The Narrator says THE RELATIONSHIP
BETWEEN RHON AND REDBERRY
HAS GONE BEYOND
OFFICIAL PARTNERSHIPS.
KARL-FRIEDRICH'S
DAUGHTER, SUSANNE,
AND HER HUSBAND THOMAS,
WENT ON A TOUR
OF CANADA'S BIOSPHERE
RESERVES IN 2011.
THE COUPLE NOW
LIVES IN REDBERRY,
AND SUSANNE IS
THE COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR
FOR THE REDBERRY LAKE
BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

The caption changes to "Thomas Abe. Associate Project Manager. Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve." He’s in his early forties. He has short dark blond hair and is clean-shaven. He wears glasses, a striped grey polo shirt and matching trousers.

Thomas says WE ALWAYS DREAMED ABOUT
GOING TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY,
AND TAKE A YEAR OFF FROM WORK,
AND JUST TRAVEL.
THERE ALREADY WAS
THAT AGREEMENT BETWEEN
OUR GERMAN BIOSPHERE RESERVE
AND THE CANADIAN ONES
AND SO WE PICKED CANADA
BECAUSE OF
THIS RELATIONSHIP.
WE SPENT TIME IN A BIOSPHERE
RESERVE VOLUNTEERING
AND THEN WE MOVED ON
AND TRAVELLED
TO A DIFFERENT
BIOSPHERE RESERVE.
SO WE SAW QUITE
A BIT OF CANADA
IN THAT ONE YEAR
AND WE REALLY ENJOYED IT.

As he speaks, the screen shows images of Thomas and Susanne together in different places.

The caption changes to "Susanne Abe. Communications Coordinator. Redberry Lake Biosphere Reserve." She’s in her mid-thirties. She has short dark blond hair down to the shoulders and wears a V-neck long-sleeve blouse.

Susanne says AND WE TRAVELLED
FOR ONE YEAR IN A VAN.
SO THAT WAS OUR HOME
FOR A YEAR.
SO WE THOUGHT IN THE WINTER
TIME WELL THAT WON'T WORK,
AND ESPECIALLY NOT
IN SASKATCHEWAN.

John says AND THEY WERE JUST
GOING TO COME TO DO
SOME VOLUNTEER WORK HERE.
AND I THOUGHT THIS
IS AN OPPORTUNITY
TO USE SOME YOUNG TALENT.
SO I SAID SURE WE'VE
GOT SOME WORK FOR YOU.

Thomas says WHEN WE MOVED INTO
OUR HOUSE HERE
IT TOOK US
PROBABLY TEN MINUTES
TO PUT EVERYTHING FROM
OUR VAN INTO THE HOUSE.
BUT WE RECEIVED A LOT
OF SUPPORT FROM THE PEOPLE
IN THE AREA
AND SO WE GOT FURNITURE,
WE GOT CLOTHES AS WE NEEDED,
WE GOT VEGETABLES.
AND SO IT WAS REALLY
A WELCOMING EXPERIENCE
AND I THINK THAT
IS VERY UNIQUE.

Karl says I AM VERY PROUD OF HER.
FOR US IT WAS ALWAYS IMPORTANT
TO EXPERIENCE NATURE.
AND TO PROTECT NATURE.
AND THAT I HAVE BOTH LOST AND
FOUND MY DAUGHTER AND SON
IN LAW INTO THIS COUNTRY IS
GREAT.
AND WE ARE VERY HAPPY THAT
BOTH HAVE FOUND A HOME HERE.

Susanne and Thomas appear on screen walking down the city with their little baby.

Susanne says I LOOK FORWARD TO
HAVING OUR LITTLE SON GROW UP
IN A SMALL COMMUNITY
LIKE HAFFORD.

The Narrator says SUSANNE AND THOMAS'S SON
MAY SOMEDAY ATTEND THE LOCAL
HAFFORD PUBLIC SCHOOL.
AFTER DECADES
OF DECLINING ENROLLMENT,
RECENT YEARS HAVE SEEN
A SLIGHT INCREASE IN THE NUMBER
OF STUDENTS ATTENDING
THE K-12 CENTRAL SCHOOL.

Now the screen shows a class at school.

Larissa says SO REMEMBER THE MOST
IMPORTANT PART
IS THAT YOU ARE HELPING
YOUR CLASSMATES TO LEARN
WHAT YOU RESEARCHED ABOUT
THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
AND REDBERRY LAKE.

The Narrator says TEACHERS LIKE LARISSA MATECHUK
ARE FINDING NUMEROUS
WAYS TO BRING
THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
DESIGNATION
INTO THE CLASSROOM.
THE SCHOOL HAS EVEN BECOME
AN "UNESCO ASSOCIATED SCHOOL,"
DEDICATED TO BUILDING
A CULTURE OF PEACE.

The caption changes to "Larissa Matechuk. Teacher. Hafford Central School." She’s in her forties. She has short dark blond hair in a bob and wears a purple short-sleeve blouse.

Larissa says THE FACT THAT WE LIVE
IN A BIOSPHERE RESERVE...
THIS IS THE HOME OF
THE CHILDREN THAT ATTEND SCHOOL.
WE CAN MAKE IT MORE CLEAR
TO THEM THE VALUES
OF SUSTAINABILITY
AND PEACE AMONG PEOPLE
AND WITH THE ENVIRONMENT.

As she speaks, new images from classes and students at school appear on screen.

The Narrator says FOR THE PAST FEW YEARS,
HAFFORD CENTRAL SCHOOL'S
GRADE SEVEN AND EIGHT STUDENTS
IN THE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT.

The caption changes to "Breanna Grzybowski. Student. Hafford Central School." She has short dark blond hair and wears a striped red and black shirt.

Breanna says IT WAS REALLY FUN.
WE GOT TO LEARN
ABOUT MIST NETS
AND WHAT KIND OF BIRDS
THERE ARE AT REDBERRY,
AND WE GOT TO BAND THE BIRDS
TO KNOW WHERE THEY ARE.

The caption changes to "Steele Thompson. Student- Hafford Central School." He has short blond hair and is clean-shaven. He wears a printed black T-shirt underneath a matching jacket.
Steele says AND I REMEMBER
WE CAUGHT TWO BIRDS,
AND ONE WAS A CLAY-
COLOURED SPARROW.
AND I DON'T REMEMBER
THE NAME OF THE OTHER ONE,
BUT I KNOW IT'S A SPARROW.

Rayna says IT WAS REALLY FUN.
WE GOT TO LEARN A LOT OF STUFF
ABOUT THE BIOSPHERE
AND WE GOT TO DO
A LOTTA ACTIVITIES.
I LIKED CATCHING
THE BIRDS THE MOST
'CAUSE WE GOT TO SEE
WHAT KINDS OF BIRDS THERE WAS,
AND TO GET TO PET THEM,
AND LET THEM GO.

As they speak, footage on screen shows the kids from school visiting places and studying the bird species.

Breanna says IT WAS REALLY FUN,
BEING WITH THE BIRDS,
AND THE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS,

Steele says I FELT, LEARNED A LOT.
MY FAVOURITE PART WAS WATCHING
THE DUCKS ON THE BINOCULARS.

Christy says I LOVE COMING HERE IT IS
A CHANCE TO BE A KID AGAIN.
YOU ARE LEARNING
ALONGSIDE THE STUDENTS
AND YOU ARE JUST
DOING FUN THINGS.

Larissa says IN CONVERSATIONS WE'VE HAD,
THE STUDENTS HAVE EXPRESSED
A SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY
FOR THE AREA THAT
THEY LIVE IN.
THEY REALLY ENJOY THE WAY OF
LIFE THAT THEIR FAMILY HAS.
THEY'RE PROUD TO BE FARMERS
AND THEY FORESEE THEIR FUTURES
TO BE HERE AS WELL
AND AS SOMEONE WHO'S GROWN UP
IN THE AREA,
I FIND THAT HELPS
THE STUDENTS AND I
TO CONNECT REALLY WELL
ON A PERSONAL BASIS.
BECAUSE I GREW UP WITH
THEIR PARENTS WE CAN DISCUSS
THAT GENERATIONS
CAN CONTINUE TO LIVE
IN THE BIOSPHERE RESERVE
AND STILL BE PRODUCTIVE
AND HAPPY.

Rayna says WE ARE IN ONE OF OUR FIELDS
JUST A FEW MILES, I GUESS,
AWAY FROM OUR HOUSE.
AND THIS IS WHERE I WANNA
BUILD MY HOME WHEN I GET OLDER.
WELL, IT'S REALLY FUN RANCHING,
'CAUSE WE ARE HELPING
THE ENVIRONMENT
AND WE ARE HELPING
OUR COWS STAY HEALTHY.
WE NEED THIS LAND,
LIKE IF IT'S GONE
WE WON'T HAVE IT BACK.
WE NEED TO KEEP IT HEALTHY
FOR AS LONG AS WE CAN
MAINTAIN IT I THINK
BECAUSE THE LONGER
WE HAVE IT
THE MORE JOY
WE HAVE IN IT.

A new clip shows the students getting back in the van and leaving the place.

The Narrator says AFTER A WEEK IN REDBERRY,
THE STUDENTS FROM
THE SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENT
AND SUSTAINABILITY
TO CONTINUE THEIR STUDIES.

Christy says MOST OF THEM JUST
BARELY GOT OFF AN AIRPLANE,
AND THEN WE PUT THEM IN A VAN,
AND WE SAID WE'RE
COMING TO REDBERRY LAKE.
SO I THINK THAT THEIR EYES WERE
STILL CLOSED WHEN THEY ARRIVED,
AND I HOPE THAT THEY COME AWAY
WITH EYES WIDE OPEN.

The caption changes to "Héloïse Garez. Student. School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan." She’s in her twenties. She has long wavy brown hair and wears a black fitted jacket.

Héloïse says BEFORE I CAME HERE,
I ALMOST THOUGHT
I WAS THE ONLY PERSON WHO
THOUGHT ABOUT THINGS THIS WAY.
BUT I REALIZE I'M NOT ALONE.

The caption changes to "Cara Baldwin. Student. School of Environment and Sustainability. University of Saskatchewan." She’s in her twenties. She has long blond hair and wears a colourful scarf and a patterned beige sweater.

Cara says I'VE LEARNED SO MUCH
THE LAST FEW DAYS.
I'VE LEARNED WAY MORE
THAN I DID IN MY UNDERGRAD.
MY UNDERGRAD IS IN BUSINESS.

Chelsea says PROBABLY MY FAVORITE PART
WAS SATURDAY NIGHT
AT THE HAFFORD HOTEL.
REALLY GETTING INSIGHT
FROM THE PEOPLE.
I GOT THE FEELING THEY'RE SORT
OF RELYING OR COUNTING ON US
TO PROVIDE WAYS THAT
THEY CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE
AND THAT THEY'RE
WILLING TO DO THAT.

As they speak, the screen shows the students doing different activities together.

Peter says I KNOW THAT THEY ENJOY
TALKING IN THE COMMUNITY
WITH THESE FOLKS.
AND IT ALL OF A SUDDEN
ISN'T JUST JOHN AND PETER
AND A FEW OTHER PEOPLE TO SAY,
"HEY, BIOSPHERE RESERVE."
THERE'S A WHOLE LOT OF
PEOPLE HERE BECAUSE OF THAT
AND PEOPLE KIND OF
START TO GET IT.

John says IF YOU DON'T START
LOOKING AFTER YOURSELVES,
YOUR OWN COMMUNITIES YOU
CAN WATCH THEM DISAPPEAR,
IT'S HAPPENING ALL
OVER THE WORLD.

Larry says IT WAS A GOOD
PLACE TO GROW UP,
IT WAS A GOOD
PLACE TO BE A KID.
I WOULD LIKE TO BE
ABLE TO PROVIDE THAT
FOR A FEW MORE
GENERATIONS OUT HERE.

Maureen says WHERE I TAKE INSPIRATION
FROM THE COMMUNITY
AT REDBERRY LAKE IS
THAT THEY HAVE WORKED
VERY HARD TO SUSTAIN
AN AREA THAT IS
PERHAPS NOT AN
ICONIC WILDERNESS,
BUT IS CERTAINLY HOME.
AND IT'S REALLY
THAT KIND OF DESIRE
TO PROTECT AND
SUSTAIN OURSELVES
THAT I THINK WE'RE
GOING TO HAVE TO INFUSE
IN OTHER PARTS
OF THE WORLD AS WELL.

Peter says MY WIFE AND I
TALKED ABOUT IT
AND SAID YOU KNOW WHAT,
IF YOU WERE LOOKING FOR
A PLACE TO LIVE AND DIE,
THIS IS PRETTY GOOD.
WE JUST DECIDED
THAT IT'S LIKE
MAKING YOUR STAND.
WE'RE NOT BIG
AND FAMOUS AND FANTASTIC,
WE'RE JUST WHO WE ARE.

A short clip of Vinessa on a canoe plays and a caption reads "In memory of Vinessa Currie-Foster. 1980-2015."

(music plays)

The end credits roll.

For more on the biosphere reserves of Striking Balance www.striking balance.ca

Director and Editor, Zach Melnick.

Producer and Graphics, Yvonne Drebert.

Executive Producer TVO, Jane Jankovic.

Copyright 2016, Striking Balance Incorporated.

Watch: Ep. 6 - Redberry Lake